THE CRAIGENDS ESTATE & MAPS BEFORE & AFTER NEW HOUSE WAS BUILT.

THE NEW HOUSE

The 1891 census indicated that the house had 58 rooms with 1 or more windows. At the time of that census John Charles Cuninghame was at home and lived with an Aunt and two Cousins. 13 servants were also in residence.
From the auction in 1961 we know that there was a dining room, main hall with staircase, drawing room, conservatory (off the drawing room), library, boudoir, small dining room, sitting room, morning room, business room, store room, napery, 6 main bedrooms, 2 main dressing rooms and several bathrooms. The map shown on this page dates from 1856 and appears to show the location of the original house just one year or so before the new house was built.

THE REAR GARDENS

At the back of the house were wonderful laid lawns with steps at each side leading down from the house to a large fountain leading on to the gravel tennis courts, walled garden and stables.

THE QUARRY

As you can see from the 1856 map on the right, the Quarry was between the back of the house and the Walled Gardens. Many references are made to the house being built using stone quarried from within the estate.

COACHMANS HOUSE

Of five rooms with 1 window or more according to the 1891 census. The house was located at the stable and barn buildings and housed the 7 members of family of John Coupar who was Coachman at the times of the 1871, 1881,1891and 1901 census.
On the map at the bottom they are to the right of the walled gardens.

THE ICEHOUSE

Primitive methods of retaining ice underground was located to the left of the house and was behind the location of the original Craigends House.
On the map you can see it was merely .007 of an acre in size. Locals say you can still see the remains if you look closely.

THE WALLED ORCHARD & GARDENS

Built in 1777 on instruction of Alexander Cuninghame. The Orchard and Garden covered 3.084 acres and were enclosed by a high stone wall. These walls were adjacent to the barn and stable as you can see from the image.
On the north side was a hot house which covered the entire breadth. On the Inner side of the wall was a fine gravel walk, forming a sort of terrace, above which stood a fine peach hothouse 63 feet long, with 8 steps on each side.
The map gives the reader a goods idea how large the walled gardens were in relation to the house, barn and stables themselves. The Quarry was just to the north. Contrast the maps from before and after the new house was built.

WOODEN BRIDGE OVER RIVER GRYFFE

Only a few hundred yards to the west of the original house was a wooden bridge (you see it crossing the River Gryffe under the item ref 1314). This bridge was only for the use by the family and the current more robust bridge is in the same place. At this point the natural rock formation on either side of the bridge is remarkable.

BUTLERS HOUSE

The Butlers house was also located at the barns and stables and was of 3 to 4 rooms. It was home of the Gillespie family at the time of the 1881 and 1891 census. Andrew Gillespie and his wife Agnes had four children, Robert William, Francis Andrew, Annie Pendrugh and Beatrice. Only Beatrice was born on the estate.

GARDNERS HOUSE

Was a large house with 5 windowed rooms. Confirming the importance of the gardening position within the estate. This was home to Head Gardner Donald McBean, his wife Isabella (who died sometime before 1891) and their six children Alexandrina, James, Mary, John, Isabella and Donald. At the time of the 1871 census the Head Gardner was John Forrest who lived there with his wife and three children Margaret, Mary and Jessie.

GARDNERS BOTHY

Appears to have been a smaller residence with only two rooms with Windows in 1891. Nevertheless it was home to the Foreman Gardner Daniel McFarlane and his two assistants John Inglis and Andrew Lowe at the time of the census. In 1881 four young men lived in this small residence, it must have been crowded indeed!

LARGE BARN & STABLES

Built in 1760 in the form of a square court with the other "office" houses using free stone from the adjacent quarry. I remember the buildings for the remarkable colourful frescoes on the walls. These would have been used for the Clydesdale Horses which the family enjoyed.

CRAIGENDS FARM HOUSES

The first house was of 4 rooms with one or more windows and was home to the Gamekeeper Mathew Gilmour and his wife Agnes in 1881 and 1891. He appears to have replaced Alexander Scott who was Gamekeeper at the time of the 1871 census.
The second house was of six rooms and was home to Land Steward Robert McLaren's family in 1881 and 1891.
There were two other Farm houses of 3 rooms each which were home to farmhand workers e.g. Shephard, Dairymaids, Ploughmans etc.

SOUTH LODGE

Two dwelling houses, one of two rooms and the other of three rooms with one or more windows. In 1891 9 members of the Mackay family lived at the larger house. John Mackay was a Joiner from Bowmore in Argyllshire and lived with his wife Catherine and their children John, Agnes, Gilbert, James, Charles, Neil and Christine. At that time the smaller house was home to Head Joiner Joseph Fraser and his wife Catherine.




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